Leadership and Coaching for Your Success

Leadership Coaching Transformation


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Seventy Years Ago Today: Utah Beach, Normandy

Hugh Nibley [off the record]

Photo of American soldiers onboard a ship approaching the coast of Normandy. American soldiers wait onboard their ship as they approach the coast of Normandy, June 6, 1944. Photo: National Archive

There was a big French battleship blazing away right next to us, and the Germans zeroed in on us with their 88s as we put the rope over the side and started to swarm down into the landing craft. As soon as I got down the rope ladder, the very spot where I should have been waiting on the ship was hit by an 88, and half a dozen tankmen were blown up. The chaplain I had been talking to was wounded. 

The landing craft went in as far as it could, and then there were still a couple of hundred yards – quite a way to go yet. I climbed in the Jeep and revved her up. I had packed it with sandbags so we could get some hold on…

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What’s your idea of fun? Contribute to a TED crowdsourced video

have fun !…

TED Blog

Fun: it comes in many shapes, sizes, temperatures and forms. What does fun mean to you?

We are creating a crowdsourced video about what fun looks like all over the world, and would love to see your contribution! This week, take a few minutes to make a video of fun in action and send it to us. You might see your definition of fun on ideas.ted.com soon.

Watch the video above to see what kind of footage we’re looking for. Ideally, we’d like clips that are 5 to 15 seconds long, that show fun as it happens rather than someone talking about it after the fact. HD footage of activities is preferred, but we are open to anything … as long as you keep it clean. Bonus points if you show something unique to your town or your country! We’ll be accepting submissions through Monday, July 7th.

Here are four…

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Turning Training into New Actions and Performance

There are relentless pursuits in corporations on how to make training as one of the key learning activities in an organisation. Many companies expect to realise the benefits of training as new actions and improvements in performance. Adopting new knowledge to be new actions require few critical steps in the process of individual learning. There are at least four critical steps to ensure the success of turning training into new actions and performance. The first step is the readiness of a learner to have a learning mindset. This means that he needs to believe that the knowledge he acquires will be applicable in his working place. Missing this will likely make training merely as one of a company social event. Secondly, the training process should address how a participant can develop new way of doing things through his speech of actions. Ability to request, reject, asses, assert, declare and promise will be critical. New actions can only be created when the learners have different conversations that generate mood of new understanding and acceptance. Thirdly, learning process should be accommodated to make participants fully understand how to respond actual challenges in the daily circumstances from the learners’ point of view. Training design in the early stage is critical to identify what are the knowing and doing gaps in their workplace (Ram Charan). We should capitalise this information into the training approach and design. Fourth, the training facilitator should use more coaching than teaching approach. The process of embedding new insights and seeding new beliefs cannot be done more effectively through teaching or preaching. A trainer with long exposure background in operational tend to teach formulas of his past glorious day. A trainer without contextual understanding might lose the sight of what are critical in the mindset of the learners. Out of these critical steps, we should not forget that the atmosphere of applying new skills should be created in the learners’ work environment. Less supportive superiors often overlook this crucial part of creating a space for applying new knowledge into action. To transform a learning into new actions, a company should involve subordinates and superiors of the learners. They need to participate in creating a space of learning for the learners. This space is vital to generate a mood of ambition in applying the new knowledge and then willingness to share it to others as it become new way of taking actions. Training can not be an isolated component of learning but part of a system that if carefully managed, will integrate few dynamic components to reinforce each others producing great impacts in performance.